Welcome to our Blog

Welcome to The Best Portugal Blog, here you will discover why we are so enthusiastic about the best things this country has to enjoy. In this first post of course we had to begin with a snapshot about one of our main focus product: the portuguese wine.

What Makes Portuguese Wines Different?

The vast majority of Portugal’s table wines are made from a blend of predominately native grapes. While many New World wine drinkers tend to be more comfortable with varietal-based (and labeled) wines, Portugal opens the door to a whole new wine adventure. The average American wine consumer has been fed wines by varietal for so long that it requires a bit of a paradigm shift to encounter and embrace Portuguese wines. However, on the flipside, there are certain categories of American wine fans that are looking for the next “wine adventure” – they want to be the first to taste, tweet and talk about a “new wine” from a “new region” – Portuguese wines will find a nice niche with this category of younger oenophiles. There is another segment of consumer that has an experienced palate and strives to diversify both their cellar and their wine tasting resume, and Portugal’s wine offerings can uniquely cater to this market segment quite well.

While Portugal is not known for a handful of specific varietals like say Chile, Argentina or California, though if pressed they can offer up some of their top five grapes grown locally: Touriga Nacional, Trincadeira Preta, Gouveio, Aragonez and Alvarinho for starters. What Portugal is known for is its traditional blend of grapes, whether it’s a field blend or a variety of grapes that have come together in the winery. The Portuguese enjoy a strong history of blending grapes and have become masters at it, beginning with Port and bringing their table wine blends to remarkable levels over the last two decades. Not unlike many well-known, Old World wine regions, Portugal’s winemaking paradigms perform a delicate dance between tradition (complete with full scale lagares, for foot-treading higher end wines) and technology. While tradition and technology are often competing for the upper-hand, many of Portugal’s producers are discovering that tradition and technology are fully capable of completing one another, in ways that make the wines better than they would be if stranded with just one vinification philosophy at work.

Styles of Portuguese Wine

Stylistically speaking, Portugal’s wines cover the gamut. From traditional Port and Madeira to full-bodied, rustic reds and oak-driven whites to vibrant, almost effervescent Vinho Verde, whose acidity and food-friendly nature make it a prime time candidate for all things summer and perfect for seafood. Most of the Portuguese wines that I’ve tasted display solid structure, with forward, fruit-focused character. Some of the reds can show a touch rustic when sipped alone, but then shine extremely well with food, a significant motivator for making Portuguese wine in the first place. Can´t you believe it? Why don´t you come over to Portugal and try it for yourself?

Discover The Best Portugal

The Best Portugal is a company that is motivated to show our visitors that Portugal is a country of small treasures difficult to discover but precisely for that reason have such a good taste when we find them. And then the people… The Portuguese are easy-going and relaxed, and are a result of a rich mixture of cultures and experiences. They are instilled with a permanent love for the sea and the mild climate, and are always ready to have a drink, share a meal or tell a story.

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